29 C
Kuala Lumpur
Sunday, December 16, 2018

RECOMMENDED

Bill Gates: GMO seeds can help farmers adapt to climate change

IN a conference call during the Global Climate Action Summit held in San Francisco on September 12-14, 2018, Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill...

Diving into IoT with Krenovator

THE average user might not know it as the Internet of Things (IoT) - but it’s a technology that is in the process of...

LATEST CHOICE

Bidayuh folk consume medicinal plants worth RM32k

THE value of traditional medicinal plants consumed by the Bidayuh native community in Sarawak each year is notably substantial at about RM32,300 (US$7,600) annually. This...

Scientists theorise new origin story for Earth’s water

EARTH’S WATER may have originated from both asteroidal material and gas left over from the formation of the Sun, according to new research. The...

Beating cancer with our immune system

The 2018 Nobel Prize Laureates for Medicine, Prof Tasuku Honjo at the University of Kyoto and Prof James Allison at Texas MD Anderson Cancer...

The Lion’s Mane mushroom, culinary and curative

BY DR WONG KAH HUI EDIBLE mushrooms represent an untapped source of nutraceuticals. They are treasured as functional food that can improve our health and...

Mouse pups with same-sex parents born in China using stem cells...

RESEARCHERS at the Chinese Academy of Sciences were able to produce healthy mice with two mothers that went on to have normal offspring of their own. Mice from two...

UKM researchers receive RM826,500 for iG-R&R research

BANGI: Smart and Sustainable Township Research Centre (SUTRA), Faculty of Engineer- ing at and Built Environment (FKAB), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) receives RM826, 500 research grant from Malaysia Highway Authority...

UPM lecturers participate in a two-way research programme in Taiwan

NEIPU, TAIWAN: Researchers from the Department of Land Manage-ment, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) participated in a Two-way Research programme at the National Pingtung University of...

Oil firm fuels STEM education in Terengganu

KUALA TERENGGANU: Exxon-Mobil Exploration and Production Malaysia Inc. (EMEPMI) continued its support for education programmes in Terengganu by backing the annual state-level competitions - Terengganu-ExxonMobil-Mathematics Innovation Challenge (TExMIC) and...

Insightful learning journey at Mabic

IF you are a student who yearns for knowledge, new experiences and good exposure to science communication and science journalism, Malaysian Biotechnology Information Centre (Mabic) is a place for...

Why can’t owls roll their eyes?

THE OWL is known as nocturnal birds. Owls are birds of prey and they have a sharp beak as well as sharp claws in order to catch and eat...

What is dactyloscopy?

HAVE YOU EVER TIP-TOED into your sibling’s room to peek into something? You probably left behind evidence of your secret visit. A fingerprint expert could likely find fingerprints...

How do foetuses breathe in the womb?

AS HUMANS, breathing is essential for our wellbeing and without breathing, we can die. Most importantly, developing babies need oxygen during the early phase of pregnancy. But a baby...

How many nerve cells are there in the brain?

THE HUMAN BRAIN has often been viewed as an outstanding organ among mammalian brains and is the most cognitively able. It is endowed with an overdeveloped cerebral cortex...

How hot is lightning?

THE MOST DESTRUCTIVE FORCE of nature is lightning. In simple terms, lightning is a sudden electrostatic discharge caused by imbalanced between storm clouds and the ground which occurs during thunderstorm. We...

What causes colour blindness?

COLOUR BLINDNESS or colour vision deficiency (CVD) affects approximately 1 in 12 men and 1 in 200 women in the world. Colour blindness is usually a genetic or hereditary...

Who invented iron?

HAVE you ever imagine, without the invention of iron, our clothes will be always wrinkled. Our soldiers or cadets will wear wrinkled uniforms. An iron is...

What is the colour of polar bears?

IF you ask any child what colour is the polar bear fur, the answer will probably be white. But scientists after years of research have found that...

Indonesia’s Bt sugarcane sees the light of day

The Petri Dish editor-in-chief Dr Mahaletchumy Arujanan hosted an email Q&A with Prof Bambang Sugiharto (BS) and Dr Agus Pakpahan (AP) who were both...

Cellphone technology developed to detect HIV

INVESTIGATORS from Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed a portable and affordable mobile diagnostic tool, utilizing a cellphone and nanotechnology, with the ability to...

Changing temperatures help corn production in US

THE past 70 years have been good for corn production in the midwestern United States, with yields increasing fivefold since the 1940s. Much of...

MPOB: Oil palm a more viable cash crop

KUALA LUMPUR: Being the most widely used and traded cash crop in the world and yet the most controversial, palm oil is here to...

Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’ll be women of the future?

SINGAPORE: Following an overwhelming response to its call to recognise talented young women across the region, the Women of the Future Awards Southeast Asia...

Genes that can ‘beef up’ cattle

BEEF cattle improvement programmes have focused for decades on promoting the rapid growth of calves. Now, the goal is to improve other traits, such...

What animal has teeth in its stomach?

The animal that has teeth in the stomach is a lobster. Lobsters have their teeth in their stomach. They chew their food in their stomach, which is very...

How do hot air balloons work?

A HOT AIR BALLOON is a unique flying craft which works because of hot air rises. By heating the air inside the balloon with the burner, it...

Astronomers discover the giant that shaped the early days of Milky...

SOME ten billion years ago, the Milky Way merged with a large galaxy. The stars from this partner, named Gaia-Enceladus, make up most of...

How sleeping in a car can kill you?

FOR many of us the car is not only a vehicle that we use to travel from Point A to Point B. Some of us take a...

UM food scientist takes ‘Women in Science’ award

KUALA LUMPUR: University of Malaya (UM) researcher Dr Chai Lay (pix) Ching was awarded the L’Oreal-UNESCO for Women in Science National Fellowship for her...

Older plantation crops release more CO2 in M’sia

OLDER rubber trees and oil palm plantations in Malaysia release more carbon dioxide from the soil into the atmosphere than younger groves, according to...

Bioeconomy Corp moves to MOA

MALAYSIAN Bioeconomy Development Corporation (Bioeconomy Corp) is now under the purview of the Ministry of Agriculture and Agro-based Industry (MOA), effective November 2, 2018. The...

Indonesia’s first GM crop to hit the market

THE government of Indonesia has approved the first locally developed genetically modified crop which will soon be commercialised in the country. The biotech sugarcane event...

Fresh insights help unlock mysteries of the first stages of life

KEY insights into how sperm and egg cells are formed have been discovered by scientists, shedding light on the earliest stages of their development. The...

A new brain-inspired architecture could improve how computers handle data

WASHINGTON, DC: IBM researchers are developing a new computer architecture, better equipped to handle increased data loads from artificial intelligence. Their designs draw on...

Human retinas grown in a dish explain how color vision develops

BIOLOGISTS at Johns Hopkins University grew human retinas from scratch to determine how cells that allow people to see in color are made. The work,...

New X-ray laser reveals structure of antibiotic- disabling enzyme

AN international collaboration led by the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron or DESY, with participation from Arizona State University’s Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery, the Department...

Smallest ever Tylosaurus fossil sheds light on species

RESEARCH by a multi-institutional team, including two members from the University of Delaware, has revealed new details about the HIV virus capsid structure and...

Are you guilty of intellectual property theft?

BY P. KANDIAH VERY often, individuals, companies or even countries are accused of stealing Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) belonging to another person or company. Allegations...

THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

BE INSPIRED

SCIENCE STAR

BRAIN TEASER

SCIENCE HUMOR

READER'S CHOICE

VIDEO